The Sapphire Jubilee of Queen Elizabeth II

Parades and pageantry in many of the big cities of the world she has seen, having travelled the world more than any other King or Queen, having visited 116 countries during her reign, but the unique thing is that she enjoys being in the town and country and loves the quiet countryside and ordinary people whom she meets during her tours.


by Victor Cherubim

(February 4, 2017, London, Sri Lanka Guardian) In 2015 The Queen became the longest reigning monarch in British history.

In 2016 she became the first British Monarch to celebrate her 90th Birthday.

In 2017, on 6th February, The Queen will have been Queen for 65 years, called a Sapphire Jubilee.

All three are historic achievements, worthy of recognition, reflection and celebration.

The history of Accession 

Queen Elizabeth as Princess Elizabeth acceded the throne on the death of her father, King George VI on 2 February 1952, when she was abroad on tour in Kenya. The rest of the tour was cancelled. Princess Elizabeth flew home to Britain as Queen Elizabeth, without coronation. With her accession the line of Royal household came into being, known as, The House of Windsor, an endeared family title.

A new era began with a Queen has Head of State, Head of the Commonwealth and Colonies, which until her reign was ruled by Kings. The last Queen was Queen Victoria

(1837 until 1901), great, great, grandmother to The Queen.

Queen Victoria’s Accession too was historic. She inherited her throne when she was an 18 year old Princess Alexandria Victoria on 21 June 1837 on the death of her uncle King William IV after his reign of 7 years.

Sixty Five Years of momentous change 

Queen Elizabeth II like Queen Victoria’s reign has marked the dawn of a momentous era in British history. From the Industrial Revolution and the vast Imperial expansion, to today’s Commonwealth and tomorrow’s Brexit, all appear to occur at tumultuous times

needing a safe pair of hands to lead and govern.

Who could say that the present Queen has seen 18 British Prime Ministers, 13 U.S.Presidents, 8 Chancellors of Germany, 6 Leaders of the Soviet Union, 2 Presidents of Russia and 7 Roman Catholic Popes during these 65 years.

Queen Elizabeth II as Head of State of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is also Head of 16 Commonwealth States and many Colonies around the world. She has as Her title reads:”By the Grace of God, Queen of the Realm, Her Other Realms, Head of the Commonwealth, Defender of the Faith. She is the Head of the Church of England and also the Royal Household.

Role of The Queen

The Queen does not make laws, but all laws of Great Britain are made in her name. As Sovereign, a role which is largely ceremonial, the monarch no longer holds any serious power, but The Queen still wields some prerogative powers herself.

The great thing about The Queen is that she has tried in every way to make her reign more modern and sensitive to a changing public while maintaining traditions centuries old associated with the Crown. She has continued to meet the people and the people love her as Grandma. To historians, she is one of the most remarkable monarchs of Britain, because she rules but does not govern.

Unwritten Customs and Traditions 

Nobody talks about the service The Queen has given, to “King and Country,” this is as a matter of respect. At her age, she has passed many milestones and performs most of her duties diligently. It was only recently when she was indisposed at Christmas time 2016, that she failed to attend Christmas service, but somehow delivered her usual annual Christmas Message, a tradition.

Parades and pageantry in many of the big cities of the world she has seen, having travelled the world more than any other King or Queen, having visited 116 countries during her reign, but the unique thing is that she enjoys being in the town and country and loves the quiet countryside and ordinary people whom she meets during her tours.

What The Queen cannot do? 

The Queen previously wielded power to dissolve Parliament and call a General Election, but the Fixed Term Parliament Act 2011, put an end to that. Custom and tradition also overrule everything that the monarch can do. But the Queen’s Consent is necessary to pass any Bill into actual law.

What does The Queen Like and dislike? 

The Queen is a very private person, She loves chocolate, sole and Dubonnet.She dislikes we are told garlic and people wearing paper crowns. The one thing her courtiers state she cannot stand is “Blubber.” We are also told she has become more humorous as she has grown older. She now tolerates the gaffes of Prince Philip and his headline grabbing impromptu remarks.

To quote a selection of the best gaffes of Prince Philip: During a visit he is alleged to have said to the President of Nigeria dressed in traditional robes:”You look like you are ready for bed” During his tour of Sri Lanka, he is supposed to have said: “You have mosquitoes, I have the Press.” “Do you still throw spears at each other” was said at a meeting with Australian Aborigines. The Duke of Edinburgh on approaching his 90 th Birthday in 2011 is said to have stated:”Bits are beginning to drop off.” The Queen was not at all amused?

Will The Queen do anything spectacular on her Sapphire Jubilee is anybody’s guess?

As the British say, “not really.”

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