Red Ball Cricket

Is there something to be said about his white ball cricket? What’s cricket and what’s not, is changing like everything else. But one thing is for sure, there will be much excitement in England later this year with the Aussies tour.


by Victor Cherubim

( February 18, 2017, London, Sri Lanka Guardian) Sooner rather than later we are heading for spring and the thought of cricket. They say we will gain 4 minutes of daylight daily until Spring officially begins on 1 March 2017.What a great idea after a long dreary winter, or as they say a degree of disorder is a novel way to appreciate nature.

Coming to cricket, traditionally red, dyed, leather balls are used in Test and First Class cricket. White balls were introduced when one day matches began played mainly at night under floodlights. Players say they are more visible for the eye at night. But now white balls are used when the game is not played at night. Players dress colour too has changed from creamy “whites” to various colours so that the ball can be spotted easily in ODI and T20 games.

There are three formats of the game, and the worry is that whether we are seeing a drift from its original characteristics of the sport? Could red and white ball cricket face a divided future? We see different coaches across the three formats of cricket in many parts of the world. England over the years has had the luxury of being able to field a core of players who appear in all three formats. Commentators now envisage a future where the 50 over and 20 over beginning to converge?

Balls v Balls

The whole thing about balls is not primarily the colour, but what matters is the familiarity and perhaps the advantage to the side in the home team and particularly, the host country’s Cricket Board. But all One Day International matches regardless of location are played with the “Kookaburra” white balls. The red “Kookaburra” Test match ball is used in most nations apart from West Indies and England who use the “Duke” manufactured and the “SG” in India.

Joe Root named as English Captain

It was well known that Joe Root, the Yorkshire man, would succeed Alastair Cook as Captain. Most of England’s captains were all batsman. It is also typically English to “fret” over taking responsibility as Captain and how it might affect his batting performance. The batting records of Alastair Cook, Andrew Strauss, and Nasser Hussain compare similar to the run scoring rate of Root up to now. But will he be able to match Michael Atherton, Peter May and Graham Gooch who saw their runs increase with their captaincy responsibility.

Root we are told will hold talks with ECB over whether an opportunity can be found for him to play red ball cricket, before he captains England for the first time against South Africa at Lords in July 2017.

Is there something to be said about his white ball cricket? What’s cricket and what’s not, is changing like everything else. But one thing is for sure, there will be much excitement in England later this year with the Aussies tour.

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